Friday, February 15, 2013

Beeman Pell Size

I'm so close to finishing the Sheridan, but it's cold and snowing and I need garage time.  I'm also nursing a hand injury (doesn't seem too serious) that's affecting my dexterity to do semi-delicate tasks--like fit a recoil pad.

Which explains why I'm doing this.














This is an old Beeman pellet sizer.  I know pellet sizing isn't fashionable these days, but I do have a gun or two that seem to function best with pellets run through a sizing die.  I'm thinking mainly of a couple vintage Crosman 600 semi-autos.   The sizer works by dropping a pellet into the center opening then pushing the plunger to force the pellet through a slightly tapered die.  It's supposed to make the pellets all the exact same diameter.  I don't think it helps with accuracy, but it seems to help reduce feeding related issues with the aforementioned pistols.   The die heads are interchangeable (notice the setscrews) for various calibers.  Functionally, it works fine as is--but it's slow.  Takes two hands to pull the plunger back to the ready.


















Beeman offered a nicer version that opened the plunger automatically via a spring as well as a stand to hold the unit vertically above a pellet tin.   I'm not interested in the stand, but the spring loaded part was really a nice feature.  Speeds up the job substantially.


















Since I need a low-key project today, this seemed like the ticket.



















Pulled out the stop pin and removed the plunger.



















Chucked the plunger in the Taig lathe.  The plunger looks like it's made from acetal (aka: delrin).



















Kissed the end to remove the bevel and achieve a true flat.




















 Spotted with a center drill.




















Drilled about 3/4" deep with a 4.2mm drill bit.




















 Followed by a M5 x 0.8mm tap.


















Looked through the scrap box and found a stubby piece of 0.750" diam aluminum.




















 Spotted




















 Through drilled to clear a M5 bolt.


















Turned down one end to 0.500"--the same diameter as the body of the  plunger.



















Changed cutters to something with more of a point and cleaned up the inside corner.




















Flipped the piece in the chuck and shortened the end with a parting tool.


































Cleaned up the cut and beveled the outer edge.  Not shown:  Countersunk the hole for a flat head.



















 Like so.




































Pressed the stop pin back into place.




















Sourced a spring at a local hardware store.  Just fits over the plunger.



















 Bolted my endcap into place.





















 Done.



































 Drop in a pellet for sizing.


































































Spring opens the sizer for the next pellet.  Works like dy-no-mite.

More soon.

2 comments:

rusty shakleford said...

Nicely done Sir

Anonymous said...

I very much appreciate what you have produced here. Your documentation is a machinist's dream. Well done sir!